6 Tips For Quality Run Training

6 Tips For Quality Run Training

Tips for Quality Run Training Train no faster than one pace quicker than the race you are training for. For example, 5k pace is good for an Olympic-distance race, while half-marathon pace suffices...

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Discom-BOB-ulated Goof January Race Shirt-a-Day Challenge

My friend Beth from Discom-BOB-ulated Running posted a great idea for a challenge that she is hosting, so I am informing you of it as well, because I like it.

augusta7

January seems always to be the month that either athletes are starting their pre-season fitness, are finishing their season or in the middle of their off-season training.  If you are in any  of those phases motivation can be a factor, so why not wear a different race shirt every day for the month of January.  C’mon….it will be fun.

I am personally not lucky enough to have a liberal dress code, but I know that I will be working out at least 20-30 times during the month of January, so I can at least wear a different one each day, plus when just strolling around the house.  Most of you can probably do that too right?

Just take a pic every day and post it to a social media site of your choice.  Stay motivated and get some wear out of all those race shirts.

In other news, I have been invited to be in a test group for the brand new P90X3 DVD workout system.  I have completed the original P90X a couple of times when it first came out and saw some great results.  The difference is that the original workouts were sometimes 90 minutes long.  P90X3 are short 30 minutes of effort and consist of several types of workouts including, power, agility, speed, isometrics and more.  I will be starting the challenge on January 6th, so I hope to be blogging a lot of my experience with it.  What will be interesting is that I will continue to be running, biking and swimming on top of these workouts. Whew!  I am getting tired just thinking about it.

You too can join the fun with your favorite Goofball (yeah, me) and order it yourself by clicking here.

 

One last thing don’t forget about the BEST DAMN RACE coming up in Tampa on February 1st and in Orlando on March 1st.  This is, without bias, one of the most well run races I have ever been involved with.  Both courses are beautiful and with beer included in your very inexpensive race fee, what is there to lose.

Best Damn Race - Safety Harbor, FL

Carpe Viam!

Goof Race Recap – HITS Ocala

Goof Race Recap – HITS Ocala

HITS is a fairly new triathlon series, with a unique concept.  Their tag line is “A distance for everyone”, which really says it all.  A HITS weekend consists of 70.3 (half-iron distance) and a 140.6(full-iron distance) on Saturday, and on Sunday, Sprint and Olympic distance triathlons.  It is a pretty cool concept, and they are really well-organized.

After having breakfast with the Team Foley after the Fight for Air Climb I headed out to Ocala with the hope of seeing at least Margie, Kari and Megan cross the finish line.   I have to admit, while I have been training, it hasn’t been as focused as it should have.  My “off-season” mentality didn’t quite transition into the race attitude just yet, but I thought I was at least in shape to do the Oly.  In triathlon season, usually the first couple of months, is usually “Base” phase which just gets the wheels and legs rolling again, develop some strength and start gaining the endurance needed for race season.  With that in mind, I figured an Olympic distance would be perfect to baseline where I am in my training.  Imagine my surprise when I saw a lot of my friends out on Saturday competing in the 70.3.  As I was watching competitors and friends cross the line there was a familiar itch developing in my heart.  I didn’t quite notice what it was at the time.

The course for the 70.3 was pretty intense with loops that included a 1.2 mile swim in a 65 degree Lake Weir, 56 miles of rolling hills and wind of the bike, and an intense mixture of soft trails, and asphalt out-and-backs for the 13.1 mile run.  I was too busy losing my lungs to catch any of the swim or bike, but I was happy to be around to see the finale of the run.

I had my first blog recognition, which was really nice.  I was at the expo, grabbing a couple of Honey Stinger gels for my race the next day and I was chatting with the owner of Kickstart Endurance and she told me she followed IronGoof.  I tried not to make a big deal out of it, but secretly I was really excited.

I missed Margie, but I was really happy to see Megan and Kari cross the finish.  They both were finishing their first 70.3 along with some other members of the Tri Psych Club, so for them this was a huge accomplishment and deserved a celebration.  That itch started to intensify at Chili’s that night as everyone’s conversation about their race surrounded me.

I really attempted to be nonchalant about this race.  I kept telling myself, “Self, this is no big deal.  You know you are not ready to race, this is a small race and this is going to tell you what you need to work on.”  Unfortunately, waking up the next morning at 4:30a, and preparing my gear not only woke up my consciousness but the competition juices and anxiety levels as well.  I showered, dressed, applied my TriTats, loaded the car and off I went.

As I mentioned before, the organization of this race was first-rate, from, staff organizing parking to the transition areas.   Have I mentioned the transition area?  In previous races I have barely glanced over the amenities of the transition areas, well except for the Rev3 Venice Beach.  Let me put it this way, if the transition areas were cars, then every other race I have been in were Toyotas, the Rev3 was a Lexus, and the HITS series was a Bentley.  Not only were there boxes that held gear and clamped a tire for easy removal of the bike, plenty of room for transition setup in-between the bikes, but each participant had their own personal stool with their number and last name on them.  It doesn’t sound like a lot, but it really is the little things that make an impression.

I headed down to the beach with my wet suit on halfway, goggles and swim cap in hand.  The temperature outside was perfect with just a slight breeze and the sun was starting to slowly creep up over the horizon.  I was incredibly grateful to see my friends down on the beach.  Pete, Kari, Megan, Michael, Stan and a couple f others as it made me feel slightly less stressed.  After the mandatory meeting, all of the males waded out a bit into the water for the start.  My anxiety reared a little due to the fact, I was using my backup goggles because my regular goggles broke in transition and this was the coldest water I had ever swam in.

The whole beach counted off, “Three, Two, One…” and the horn blew.  We all ran or dolphin dived toward the first buoy.  The water was kind of shallow so I did have some time to start to get used to the water.  I remembered my strategy and my stroke count and I started swimming.  I started losing ground within the first 200m, which was normal for me.  My new stroke technique is still relatively new, so I figured I wasn’t going to be fast immediately.  When I reached the first buoy, I started feeling short of breath, even though I thought I was relatively relaxed.  My chest started to feel compressed like I was being stepped on, and my arms were not moving as freely as I wanted them to.  I moved to breast stoke to see if I could relax a bit, but it was to know avail, the compression would just not loosen. I have never had an issue with my wet suit.  Except for getting out of it, I kinda like it.  I feel more buoyant, warmer and protected from other things that may cause issues in open water.  Now I just felt like it was python, strangling me. I kept going, but it was a combination of freestyle, side stroke, and breast stoke.  When I reached the second buoy, my mind went into overdrive trying to get me to quit.  The ideas popping in my head were asinine.  I kept hearing, “You aren’t trained for this”, “You don’t belong here.”, “Just get out of the water.  It is only a baseline remember?”.  The thing was, I had another loop to do.  I swam toward third buoy, and the water became very shallow, so we really didn’t have any choice but to run through it and start dolphin diving again.   I forced myself to have the one thought that has gotten me through tough training, cold, wet and rainy workouts, and exhausting races; “The mind will quit one-hundred times before the body does.”  I told myself, “Self, that is first and only time that is going to happen today.”  I ran around the third buoy and headed out for my second loop.

The second loop felt a little better, but I was so happy to get out of that wet suit.  I am still not quite certain why I felt that way. It wasn’t the size of the wet suit because when I bought it I was 25 pounds heavier.  Either way I ran out of the water unzipping and getting out of it on my way to transition.  One of the strippers told me to lay down and she yanked it off of me.  I grabbed my helmet while I put on my shoes and crossed the mat in less than 3 minutes.  

bike2

The bike course was actually pretty nice.  Rolling hills, with well conditioned roads and plenty help by the Sheriff’s department.  I wanted to make up sometime, so in my head I thought to just keep passing people.  I only got passed twice during the first ten miles of the twenty-five mile course and I was happy with that.  I played cat & mouse with a couple of them, and ended up passing them in during the last half of the course.  Unfortunately, there was a storm on the horizon and the wind picked up quite a bit on on the second half, not to mention the hills were more abundant and steeper(at least for Florida).   My speed, that I was holding quite consistent at 21 mph started to drop to 18, then 17 and at that point, I refused to go under 18 mph.  I came into transition, averaging 19.1 and I was proud of that.

I racked my bike and sat on my stool to put on my socks and shoes.  I got hung up a little bit, but was still out of there in less than 3 minutes, and it was off to the run.  Pete yelled at me as I headed into the trees, “This is the fun part”.  At first I agreed with him.

run2

I decided to wear my Hoka One One Biondi Speed 2 running shoes with the large sole, because I wanted to test how they felt on a triathlon after being on the bike.  Big mistake.  At first the ground wasn’t very soft, and I was ok running about an 8:15 mile, but as I got further into the woods, the trail got softer and softer.  With that big sole, not only was my foot pushing down on the sole, but then into the soft ground causing three times as much resistance as the a regular running shoe.  I didn’t figure this out at first, but after one-and-a-half miles, I felt like I needed to stop, and that was not usual, not matter what kind of shape I was in.  I walked at the aid station for about 200 yards and then I continued running but at a much slower pace.  I had to do two loops of the run course as well, and I could feel the resistance ease off when I hit the asphalt again.  All of the sudden I was lighter and faster, but I had to do a second  loop into the woods again.  I decided my strategy would be to walk a hundred yards at the aid station and 100 yards at the turn-around, but other than that I would let my legs do what could.   It worked out well as my splits were faster on the second loop.

I ran out of the woods with Pete snapping shots and hearing cheers from Megan, Kari and a couple of others.  As, I crossed the finish line it became clear to me, that I am not in the shape I was in for my last 70.3, but I would enjoy this moment as a victory.  It was not a PR, but it this race let me know what I need to do over the next months in order to take on the rest of my race schedule.

After calming down a bit and chatting with Pete and a few other friends, Summer Bailey found me.  She had competed in the 70.3 the day before.  Summer lives in Georgia, so we really only see each other at races and occasionally chat on Facebook  so it was really incredible to actually chat and catch up with her in person.  She is an amazing woman and with a huge heart and ferocious determination.  We both agreed that neither one of us had trained enough for our races, but it was good to have a race under our belt for the year.  Chatting with her was encouraging, and I know we will be seeing each other again during the season.   To be able to see and chat with her and some others that I do not get to train with allowed me to remember one of the greatest thing about triathlon and racing in general.  It’s the friends  and connections we make.  Other than having a good race and crossing the finish line, it is the best part about it.

 

Besides crossing the finish line what are the best experiences you have competing?

 

Carpe Viam!

 

So it starts – Ironman Season Training Day #1

PB&J before our ride this weekend

Have you ever heard that saying “Today is first day of the rest of your life”? Today started my Ironman Journey #2 and I was excited last night to get started. No more excuses, no more waiting, today was the day the plan actually started. Of course I was so excited that I couldn’t sleep last night, but I got up anyway and got on my trainer for an hour of high intensity cycling in order to document my Lactate Threshold Heart Rate and Power Zone.

Today, I had to take two Lactate Threshold tests. The LT test determines at what heart rate and power wattage that you blood delivers oxygen to your muscles most efficiently. The scientific definition is the maximum steady state effort that can be maintained without lactate continually increasing. Lactate builds up not allowing oxygen to be utilized. Stay within the LT and the body will be able to keep working efficiently which turns into long amounts of time at that heart rate.

The greatest thing about knowing your Lactate Threshold is that you can train to make it even more efficient. A higher threshold means the body can keep going at higher intensity which turns into speed in the case of triathlon. The caveat is that in order to increase the LT, it has to be done slowly. More workouts above the LT will increase it, but the more the body and muscles are working above it, the shorter the duration until the muscles learn to work with less oxygen making them work a lot more efficiently. This is why the trends have been hit the gym hard, and the endurance will come.

I have a buddy Blayne, whom decided to make the move to CrossFit which is the epitome of high intensity training. I have done a couple of these workouts in the off-season and the actual work in class may only be 20 minutes, but the participants are wrecked afterwards. Let me get back to Blayne. He started taking part in CrossFit religiously, and trained very little for the Rev3 70.3 and completed it with no problem and did really well. The story doesn’t stop there. He entered a 50 mile road race a few weeks later without running more than 9 miles and he completed it and I saw him two days later as he was entering the coffee shop from another CrossFit class and he looked fine. (Maybe I should put the disclaimer that says “results not typical”?) Did I mention the guy is in his 40s?

More and more I have read about triathletes either taking up CrossFit, High Intensity Training(HIT), or supplementing their training with either. It makes sense. A couple of times a week, a short circuit sets of heavy weight(with good form) and the body works higher than it’s LT training the muscles to work with less oxygen. If the body continues to train this way, it makes sense the muscles adapt to utilizing a lower amount of oxygen. When the intensity is lowered, the heart rate reduces allowing more oxygenated blood to the muscles which actually increases the aerobic capacity or VO2. Increased VO2 allows the body to work harder at a longer rate.

Whew! Enough science. My first week looks like this:

I look at it now and it looks daunting. doesn’t it?  This is the base phase of the plan, it gets busier and more intense as we get to the build and peak phases.  I think I am in for a lot of fun this season.  Speaking of season, my race schedule is posted on the right side pane of the page.
Yeah.  Over there 
 
 
FYI – I promise you I am not going to be blogging everyday about my workout that will just get boring, but when I have an epiphone or a breakthrough, that is when the post will be out.  Of course I plan on conitnuing with any race reports, product reviews, cool new recipies and tributes to the those inspirational people I find so…well…inspirational.
Have a great week.
Carpe Viam!  Carpe Momentum!

A New Year, A New Goof

Ragnar Relay Finish

Happy New year from the IronGoof. I hope everyone had a relaxing and pleasant holiday season. I took some time away from the Social Media stage for awhile which of course, coincided with my off-season and the holidays. Oh, I checked in from time-to-time, so I wasn’t completely away, but for the most part the last couple of weeks was pretty much spending time with family for the holidays, working a little and of course just this last weekend; Ragnar Relay: Miami-Key West. More on that later.

 I want to mention my opinions on New Year’s Resolutions. Personally, to RESOLVE to make changes leaves a lot of room for disappointment, but to decide to make positive changes in your life or set goals allows for a journey. It is a trail to blaze and a challenge to conquer, not just an idea that might take shape. I always thought the best way to start a new year is to document what is to be accomplished in the coming year. What makes this blog kinda cool is that now I can publish it and be accountable to everyone. So here they are:

  Personal:
1. Get over my fear of leaving my day job and get my business off the ground.
2. Reduce debt by minimally 50%
3. Re-commit to a financial plan and budget
3. Complete my Certified Personal Trainer, USAT Level 1 coach and USATF Level 1 and minimally begin my Certified Nutrition Professional.
4. Blog at least 5 times a week

 Sports & Fitness:
1. 2 Ironman Triathlons: IM Louisville, IM Florida
2. IM FL in less than 12 hours
3. Running average pace at 7:30 min/mile at RPE 2
4. Biking average pace at 22 mph at RPE 2
5. Swim at 1:45 per 100m at RPE 3
6. Start CrossFit as strength training
7. 1 half-marathon at 1:35 or less

A little aggressive?  Absolutely, but isn’t that what life is all about?  As my friend Casey would say, “Go big or Go home!”.  The secret goal I have, which obviously will not be so secret anymore is to take on the motto:  “Always be doing something that matters.”  For example, watching the boob tube means nothing and does nothing for anyone.  Does that mean I am going to stop watching TV?  Heck no, but this year it will not be the only thing I am doing.  If the TV is on, then I need to be doing something else as well.  Blogging, training on the bike trainer or the treadmill, foam rolling, stretching, something besides just being a spectator.  

That is the plan for my year.  What are your goals?

I have so much to write about.  I have reviews to blog about, race reports to write.  Be prepared to be seeing a little more activity than normal from the Goof.

Brandon Half Marathon

Coming up:
Brandon Half Marathon Race Recap
Nexus 7 tablet review
Hydro Flask Review
Just Say No 10k Race Recap
Samsung 18 megapixel Camera review
Ragnar Relay Recap

I might be doing all this in just a couple of posts, so it may be long, or will it.  I may have another way of getting you the information.  Just wait and see.

Here’s a  new tag line I am adopting to keep all of you motivated this year from my friend Summer Bailey:

“Carpe Momentum”
 (Seize the Moment)

Lazy, Hazy, Crazy Days of the Off Season

There have been so much I have been wanting to write about, but my time has been taken up by this thing I have to do called “a job”.  Do any of you out there have this same problem?  It is really starting to get in the way of my training, coaching and especially my blogging.  I cannot believe how long it has been since I have posted something, and it is a crime with all the ideas that have been flying around in my head.

Let me use this post as a way to get back into the habit of blogging daily or at least a few times a week.  Subject – The Off Season.

I have been toiling with this for the past month just because I have been finding myself not working out a little less than normal.  When I do, I am enjoying lower durations with small bursts of high effort, a.k.a intervals.  As I speak with some of my fellow cohorts in triathlon I have been getting two primarily different opinions.  One is coming from the die-hards, “Off season??  What off season?  There is NO off-season!”, the other is coming from most of the guys that actually take podiums, but have more time to train during race season.  “Dude, you have to come down a bit and give your body a rest.  You have been putting it through a lot of stress.  Trust me bro, you will have a better race season if you slow down a bit and take some rest.”    So, what does a guy in my position do?  I want to improve, but my philosophy is all about injury prevention.

Looking at the science of it I came up with the following opinion (notice I said opinion?):

Working out is cumulative – everything you do to a muscle repeatedly continues to impact it no matter what you are doing.  Why do most marathon training plans have the mileage go up for 3 weeks and then dramatically falls the 4th week?  The quadriceps  hamstrings, calves, have taken a beating for three weeks and they need time to recuperate.  The fibers of the muscle need time to repair, but if they keep being taxed then they stretch and start to heal they are taxed again.  Even though they have started the healing process, they cannot fully heal unless they are put at rest for a significant amount of time.  Yes, with proper nutrition, and preemptive injury therapy the healing can be expedited to a point, but they surely will not heal completely unless they are at rest.

 Running everyday for 15 days in a row no matter how much the workouts change from slow to fast twitch muscles and back again, put a cumulative toll on your body.  Now put that in perspective of a triathlete’s season that starts with base workouts in late January and doesn’t end until late October early November.  That is 10 months of a cumulative toll on the body, whether you are an age grouper or pro.  Do you think with that kind of wear and tear on the body that if there isn’t a slow down in the frequency and a lowering of the effort level that there might be some injuries awaiting or at least some backsliding in the coming racing season?  I do.

Fact:  It takes even a pro marathoner 20 days to fully recuperate from a race.  26.2 hard miles on the body of a fully trained marathoner, still takes a long time to recuperate doesn’t it?  What do you think that does to an age grouper?

I am going to take this month as it comes.  I am going to do a few races, and if I don’t feel like working out when the alarm goes off, so be it.  When January comes I’ll be doing my base mileage and continuing my strength and flexibility training as planned, but when February 1st comes…..IT”S ON!!!!!

When will you start your race season training?

Carpe Viam!!